Updates

2019.07

Favorite Articles

Games Played

2019.06

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2019.05

Bands I Have Listened To

A new appendix has been created to keep track of all of the artists and bands that I have listened to. Like some of my other lists, this is incomplete as of this month, but I plan to work through and have it updated as time allows.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2019.04

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2019.03

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2019.02

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2019.01

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2018.12

Year In Review

Years In Review now includes some of my favorites from 2018.

Mini Game Reviews

I have always enjoyed writing about the games that I play, highlighting my favorite aspects of the work. One problem I have when doing this is that I constantly find new rabbit holes to go down. The game review slowly turns into a whole article about every aspect of the game, what the developers intentions were, what worked and didn't work, etc. To counter this, I created Mini Game Reviews with the intent of writing a short review for every game I play. My target is to have a 3-5 paragraph goal for each review, so I can talk about what I liked and didn't like, and my overall impression of the game. Some games I plan to write more about, but these in-depth articles can be reserved for specific games, not every one that I play.

Favorite Articles

Epic Games launched a new digital game store and launcher for the PC. On one hand, the store looks like a good deal for developers, as they receive 88% of the sale price for selling their games there. But on the other hand, Epic seems to have already landed a bunch of exclusives that are being pulled from Steam before launch. It is unknown right now if these games will remain solely on the Epic Games Store, or if it is a timed exclusive and will later be released on Steam. I am not a fan of every game publisher having their own launcher that needs to be downloaded, so I will be holding off on this for now until the market shakes out.

The original Doom is a masterwork in gaming. It helped push technology and game design forward in ways few games can do. When I read that John Romero himself is going to release a new episode to the game, with 9 new levels, I was overjoyed. His work on the Doom series played a huge role in the success of the game, so more content from him in commemoration of the game's 25th anniversary is something I am looking forward to greatly.

Rust 2018 launched this month. Rust has been one of my most used languages this year, with a lot of puzzle-work and CLI tools written in it. It has been a great alternative to C and C++ for me, and has made me more critical of other languages, including certain aspects of Swift. I look forward to using it more going forward.

The web is at its best when there are multiple renderers available, as it keeps no single entity from controlling what is and is not acceptable for a browser to render. Blink/Chromium already is the big kid on the block when it comes to web browsing, and Microsoft's announcement that their own web renderer is having its development ended will increase this in the future. There are now only 3 viable web rendering engines available, and given the complexity of the web, it is not likely that the number will later increase again.

Every month, more information comes out about how Facebook has abused its users data. Also every month, I remain glad that I have nothing to do with their services anymore.

Google does many things well. One thing it does not do well is keeping a focused strategy on its instant messaging applications. Every year or two, Google launches a new instant messager that replaces the old one. This month, Google announced the deprecation of Google Allo, a service they just launched two years ago. Google needs to learn from other services that long-term development is how services like this take off, not simply launching it with flashy features and then killing it immediately when it does not take over the world at once.

AnandTech's year in review is a great summary of what happened in technology this year.

Google's secrecy around their work to reintroduce Google Search to China has had a lot of negative fallout. The company will be hard-pressed to continue the project without more internal backlash, although Google seems intent to move the project forward in some form.

The below are some various other articles that I enjoyed.

Books Read

Games Played

2018.11

Favorite Articles

The games of Blizzard Entertainment were foundational in shaping the games I enjoy today. Diablo 2, Warcraft 3, and World of Warcraft in particular are games that I hold in high esteem. Blizzard did not announce a Diablo 2 remaster like I was hoping for, but did announce a remaster for Warcraft 3 and the release of World of Warcraft Classic. Both are games I am interested in going back to and playing again, and both are to be released next year.

The 2018 Mac Mini more and more looks like a Mac Mini Pro. The CPU in it makes it one of the faster Macs in history, comparable with the latest MacBook Pros and iMac Pros. Important to me, the RAM is again upgradeable on it without too much hassle. I look forward to ordering a new Mac Mini sometime soon and putting it through its paces.

For the past few years, Apple's in-house CPUs have been getting closer to Intel in overall performance. This year's A12X surpasses many of Intel's mobile offerings, and is competitive with their desktop performance. It seems to only be a matter of time before Apple transplants these chips over to Macs.

Genetic engineering has long been a topic of science fiction. Up until now, it has been an area beyond the reach of humanity. The recent announcement of a Chinese team editing the DNA of babies before birth to try and reduce their risk of HIV has thrown this question to the forefront of a lot of scientists minds. It is a perilous path to go down, but also one that seems inevitable.

The below are some various other articles that I enjoyed.

Books Read

Games Played

2018.10

Why Automate

One of the fundamental uses of computer devices is to automate my life. I try to run my life based on the principles set forth by David Allen in his GTD book, and a large part of his work relies on offloading tasks to something else that can properly handle it. For me, this is a mixture of computer scripts, applications, and workflows to make better use of my time. Why Automate? goes into specifics of how and why I love doing this.

Automating Podcasts

There are many ways to automate computer usage, but one of the less talked about ways is to make GUI tools function on there own. Automating Podcasts highlights how I use the iOS app Overcast to operate on its own other than needing to hit the play and stop buttons.

Favorite Articles

California has been working on a new net neutrality bill this year, and it has now been signed into law. There will be a huge legal fight over this law as well as those passed in the state of Washington, but it is an important fight. The openness of the internet helped give us the technological boon of the last couple of decades. Without it, innovation will be stifled, and current services will be more dificult to use.

Facebook is not the only company that is having problems with their social media service. This month, it was discovered that an open API allowed for access to Google+ profile data that was meant to be private. Google claims that their API logs only last for two weeks, meaning the extent of damage caused by this is unknown. Their response of completely shuttering Google+ for non-enterprise users seems extreme, although Google+ has not made a mark on the social media market.

Paul Allen passed away this month. Without him, Microsoft would have never been founded and the modern computing landscape would look a lot different.

Facebook remains consistent in its quest to gather as much data on its users as possible. Portal, their new in-home video calling device, will collect data with the purpose of serving ads to the user. No matter how you try to interact with Facebook, they do everything in their power to build a profile for advertising purposes.

I've been interested in and following Linux since I was in high school, and during that entire time, Red Hat has been a major player in the operating system. It's hard to say right now whether this acquisition will help or hurt Red Hat's offerings in the long run, or how it will affect the rest of the Linux ecosystem, but this might be the solution to IBM's business concerns.

After 1475 days, Apple updated my beloved Mac Mini. The new updates are more than a simple spec bump, as the port configuration on the back is revamped and the internal component layout is new. Despite the lack of love that it gets, the Mac Mini is my favorite Mac in Apple's lineup, and I am incredibly happy to see such a huge leap in its power.

The below are some various other articles that I enjoyed.

Books Read

Games Played

2018.09

Favorite Articles

As I have previously written about, the smartphone form-factor is one that I grow less in love with by the day. Has been been typical now for almost a decade, Apple announced new iPhones this month, and as interesting as they might be, the new Apple Watch Series 4 is what really interested me. Apple has been doing great with wearables, and I have particular love for my Apple Watch. The new Series 4 is going to be a quick purchase for me.

Overcast has been my go-to podcast player since its release. Marco Arment has always provided great updates and new features to it, while keeping it true to its minimal ideals. Overcast 5 continues the trend of supporting new features in iOS on day one, with the newest update adding Siri integration and Apple Watch support. The Apple Watch support is of special interest to me, as I consider ways to continue downgrading my iPhone's role in my life.

Elon Musk's announcement of the first private citizen to fly around the moon is extraordinary. The world is officially entering the age of private space flight. Despite it currently being limited to the wealthy, like most things in history, more and more individuals will be able to participate. This is one of the first steps to future colonization outside of our planet.

Automating my life has been a theme of mine this year, and OmniFocus has been at the center of it. It's capabilities has been like no other task management system that I have used, and after getting over the large mental investment in understanding how it works, it is now one of my most used applications. OmniFocus 3 is now available on all platforms, and most importantly the Mac, and so far, it is a strong improvement over the previous version.

The below are some various other articles that I enjoyed.

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2018.08

Simplifying the Smartphone

Simplifying the Smartphone documents my attempt to break my smartphone addiction. I modeled my iPhone setup on the Siempo phone, an unreleased smartphone that aimed to provide the bare necessities without all of the negatives. I have had my iPhone setup like this for roughly 6 months now, and consider the experiment a success, albeit with some small app consolidations to make in the future.

Favorite Articles

During the early 2000s, Amazon was a company that I frequently shopped on. My purchase history goes back quite far, with thousands of dollars spend over the years. In recent years, that has changed. Amazon is no longer the reliable seller that they used to be, with fake products and paid reviews becoming normalized. When I purchase something from then, I no longer can trust that I will receive what I am expecting. If there is something that I must purchase online, Amazon is the last resort for me, even if it means spending more money elsewhere. The final s

AMD's newest offerings this year and last have done a lot to bring much needed competition to Intel. Their new 32-core offering is the nichest of niche products, but shows how far they have come in the past decade. I am reminded of the AMD of 18 years ago, bring better performance than Intel's offerings while also being cheaper. I hope AMD is in the same spot when I am in the market for a new CPU in 4-5 years.

As someone who still freelances with web technology, it's hard for me to say that every aspect of it is bad. But what gets glossed over in trying to use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for everything is that there are large performance costs to users. JavaScript has a place in the stack, but these problems can not be hand-waved away.

I am a bit of a security nut. Strong passwords are important to me, and I keep my personal security regime as up-to-date as possible. What was considered best practices a few years ago can turn into a new way to be exploited. Two-factor authentication was heralded as the savior of hacked passwords, but this is contingent on the two-factor method being secure. Currently, two-factor through text messages is not.

It has been a year and a half since I last used Facebook, and the social media environment has continued to devolve since then. Social media might have a place for some, but as we learn more about how it affects people, the less positive it seems to be.

In the same vein of social media, I find myself drawn further away from mainstream gaming communities. Toxicity has been present in gaming for as long as I can remember, but the largest of games take it to the next level.

The below are some various other articles that I enjoyed.

Books Read

Games Played

2018.07

Exit Status Codes

An important part of building any CLI tool on a Unix system is to have it interact with the rest of the system in a Unix-y way. One way this manifests is by providing the proper exit status upon termination of the executable. Outside of the most basic response of success or error, this means assigning meaning to numbers that do not have any standard meaning. Exit Status Codes highlights what I found as the best practices for implementing these codes beyond the basics provided by individual programming languages.

Updates

Software Tools: Over the past few months, I have been using git more from the command-line and relying less on Tower. Having a GUI front-end was useful while learning the intricacies of git, but as time went on, it turned into a crutch. Tower is still my recommendation for a GUI git client for anyone who asks, but I myself no longer use it.

Tracking Sleep: iOS's Do Not Disturb mode is an important part of sleep tracking, as without it, it would be precarious to sleep with both my iPhone and Watch nearby. I have updated the importance of using this 6 year old feature.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2018.06

The Games of Tomorrow Corporation

Tomorrow Corporation makes some of my all-time favorite games. Each of their games have impacted me deeply, from the story and music to the fun gameplay. In The Games of Tomorrow Corporation, I talk a little about why I love these games so much.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2018.05

Traveling Minimally

One of my least favorite parts of traveling is packing. Going down a long checklist of necessary items before hand and then double checking to make sure everything is packed before returning takes away from the joy of visiting other parts of the world. To help with this, I keep a simple philosophy of Traveling Minimally that helps make my daily travels and vacations much easier to handle.

Updates

With the recreation of my iTunes library earlier this year, my collection of Work Music has been updated. A number of genres have been dropped entirely, and the back to basics approach that I have taken with music as a whole has changed what I listen to while I work.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2018.04

CLI Tools

One of the big reasons that I continue to keep macOS as my primary operating system is the first-class terminal access that it provides. Much of my work is done in GUI applications, but a command-line is always present on my screen. CLI Tools is a list of all of my currently used tools, with a quick reference for the most commonly used commands.

Updates

Disabling Gaming Platforms' Social Features now includes information about disabling certain features of Xbox Live on Windows. This is largely not a concern as there is little functionality within Xbox Live on Windows, but being able to control it some is still a plus.

Scripting with Swift has been updated to include more guidance on how to use Swift for command-line scripting purposes. One of my favorite aspects of Swift is how well it works for scripting, so I have expanded on why it is so great.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2018.03

Updating Sublime

When it comes to programming tools, I am always looking at what is available that might replace what I currently have. Last year, I wanted to give all of the major text editors a go to see if it was worth considering replacing Sublime Text as my main text editor after many years of use. The experiments were fruitful, and while I am back using Sublime for the foreseeable future, I took away a lot of useful information from how the other editors functioned that I have included in Updating Sublime Text.

Updates

Software Tools has been updated with many new categories of tools, as well as updates to old tools that I no longer use.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2018.02

Updates

This month, I finished up the notes I took for The Half-Life of Facts. This book looks as how knowledge changes over time, and particularly how different fields are affected. It also highlights some of the issues that modern research has, particularly with regards to how incorrect facts can persist no matter what other research shows.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2018.01

Updates

Moonwalking With Einstein is a great read about the techniques used by master memory competition champions. This has been one of the more fun books I have read recently, especially since I sometimes worry that my memory is going bad. It isn't, necessarily, but I still plan to incorporate some of the techniques mentioned in this book to try and remember more things, instead of simply relying on technology to do it for me.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2017.12.31

Year In Review

2017 has come and gone. Years In Review has been updated with some of my favorite games, music, and thoughts about the year.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2017.11.30

Rebooting iTunes

Nearly 10 years ago, I created the iTunes library that I had been using consistently up until 6 months ago. This library was bloated and hard to reason around, as it had more songs in it than I could listen to. To fix this problem, I decided to reboot iTunes, to purge everything out of it and start fresh. This has been a huge task and one that I was unsure would work out, but in the end, it has helped revitalize my music listening and helped solidify what I actually enjoy listening to.

Selecting Movies

On an old version of The Krueger Report, I wrote about how the amount of new movies I was watching had gone down. At the time, I resolved to watch at least a couple new movies every month, working down the list of what is considered the best movies of all time as well as any personal preferences that I have. I kept up this habit for about about a year, but then it again fell by the wayside. Getting back in the habit of selecting movies to watch and keeping up with it is a goal of mine for the upcoming year.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

Movies Watched

2017.10.31

Notes On Books

A new habit that I have picked up recently is taking notes on non-fiction books that I can reference later. Taking notes has forced me to slow down my reading speed while also reinforcing my comprehension of the work. Since The Krueger Report is as much a reference for myself as anyone else, adding those notes here makes sense. My initial entries into this category are for a pair of books: Crash Override and Resilient Web Design.

Favorite Articles

Books Read

Games Played

2017.09.30

Setting Up Homebrew

Homebrew is one of my most used utilities on macOS. Setting Up Homebrew is both a quick guide for setting up Homebrew from scratch and a reference for its most used commands.

Updates

I have added current screenshots of both my iOS and macOS workspaces to About The Author. Monthly updates to this are my intention, so that I can see how my workspaces change with time.

Books Read

Favorite Articles

Games Played

2017.09.04

Scripting With Swift

One of my favorite parts of macOS is the scripting capabilities of it. GUI applications can be scripted with AppleScript, and terminal applications and OS-level features can be scripted using Bash, Python, and now Swift. I've been experimenting with creating scripts using Swift, and while the results are still early, it's turning out to be a capable language for this usage.

Walt Disney World - 2016

Last year, Whitney and I went to Walt Disney World. This was my third trip there, but the first for Whitney. I did not take as many photographs as I would have liked, some of the highlights are included here.

Solar Eclipse - 2017

This month saw a total eclipse pass over the United States. While it did not pass with 100% coverage over Portland, it was close enough to make it worth a short trip out to see it.

Updates

Since I have now been tracking my sleep for over a year, I am able to include an example of the graphical representation from health of that sleep data.

I categorized all of the tools I have listed on Software Tools. By breaking it up into operating system and task categories, I am better able to see my reliance on any single operating system. macOS remains the more important operating system for my uses, particularly with more power user functions, but iOS is catching up. I will continue my goal of staying as cross-platform as possible, should the day ever arrive where removing macOS from the equation is a possibility.

Books Read

Favorite Articles

Games Played

2017.08.12

base-css

Last month as I was working on revamping this site's theme, I decided to create a small set of boilerplate CSS that I can use on future projects. What I have called base-css is my new set of CSS that I used as the core of the new theme. Going forward, I plan to use base-css for all projects just so that some essential values can be set without having to spend time rebuilding it from scratch.

Movies I Have Watched

Movies I Have Watched is a new appendix with a list of all of the movies I have watched. There are some that will be missing from that list as of right now, but after having spent a few hours working on this, I know the vast majority are already listed.

Notes On Final Fantasy XIV

Final Fantasy XIV has been my main MMORPG since it's relaunch in August, 2013. One of my favorite aspects of the game is the focus on Trials, which are essentially boss fights without a corresponding dungeon to clear through beforehand. Notes On Final Fantasy XIV is mostly notes to myself on what to watch for during each Trial, from the perspective of a main-tank or off-tank.

Updates

A few months back, Amazon Drive pricing changed from being $5/month for unlimited storage to $5/month per terabyte of storage. At the time of the change, I did not feel the need to change my backup plan, but at the back of my mind was the fleeting thought that Amazon might change their offerings again. After surveying the backup field again, I have since moved my backups off of Amazon to B2.

Books Read

Favorite Articles

Games Played

Movies Watched

2017.07.20

A Slightly New Look

I updated the overall theme this month to a darker theme. Lately, I have found myself living inside of dark themed code editors and terminal windows, and wanted my website to match this overall aesthetic. Other sections of the CSS were simplified and cleaned up. Swapping color palettes in the future should be easy, as there are 6 Sass variables that control the entire scheme.

Most blogs are lighter in color, with common thinking being that dark text on a light background is most legible. This might be the case, but I still wanted to try to do the opposite, to see where it would lead me. I am happy with the results so far, especially because it did not take too much time to rework the code to accommodate this look.

Helpful Algorithms

In programming, algorithms and functions are one of the main tools at your disposal. Many functions can be re-used in later projects. Helpful Algorithms is a resource for common algorithms that I use. Starting out, a lot of them are math functions that I created for Project Euler, but I also plan to go back and learn more fundamental programming algorithms and create my own implementations of them.

Updates

I did not make any substantial updates to any pages this month, due to focusing on updating the theme of the site. Additionally, as can be seen below, I spent a lot of time this month both playing new games and reading, which left less time for writing than normal.

Books Read

Favorite Articles

Games Played

2017.06.27

Hello, World!

I have never written a proper introduction for The Krueger Report. This has now been corrected with Hello, World!, with my objectives of this site as well as how I am accomplishing that.

Updates

With Amazon Cloud Drive's removal of unlimited storage, I needed to review my Backup plan. Even at a price of $5/month per terabyte instead of $5/month for unlimited, Amazon Cloud Drive remains one of the best deals available For now, I am not changing what service I am backing up to, although Amazon's penchant for changing their offerings with little notice outside of core AWS services leaves me wary of continuing to use them into the future.

Books Read

Favorite Articles

Games Played

2017.06.12

Appendices

One of the (largely less interesting?) parts of this project is documenting all of the types of media that I have experienced. The first page of this was Games I Have Played, and with the addition of Podcasts I Have Listened To, I decided to move this information to a new section. Since I am mimicking the structure of a book, I thought that putting these in as Appendices made sense, since it's less important information and can sit at the end of the whole project. It also opens up the possibility of me adding other appendices as time goes on without it diluting the worth of other content.

Books Read

Favorite Readings

Games Played

Updates

In the past month, I have revamped my Exercise Routine. The activities are largely the same, but I have moved away from certain exercises being done only on certain days. The scripts for calculating my exercise build-ups has also been updated to Python due to the simplicity of the used code.

In March, GOG updated GOG Galaxy to include more typical gaming platform features: achievement tracking and playtime tracking. Since these are features that I do not wish to take part in, I explored if GOG allowed these features to be disabled. Thankfully, they are, and I have updated Disabling Gaming Platforms' Social Features with that information.

I added a few more problems to Project Euler In Swift, but not as many as I would have liked. The past few months, I have been experimenting with the tools I use to program, and going through a philosophical debate between the lean Sublime Text and heavier Xcode. With the addition of a solid-state drive in my Mac Mini and all of the recent announcements at WWDC 2017, I have decided to double down not only on Xcode but GUI application development as well. Project Euler will continue to be my weekly programming puzzle to solve, but I will first be reworking it to fit better into Xcode.

2017.05.14

Iced Coffee

One of the first things I do every morning is start drinking a nice cool cup of coffee. It helps start my day quicker and jump right into the tasks that I have for the day. Over the last few years, I have worked on perfecting my Iced Coffee recipe, and have found an easy and consistent way to make it exactly to my liking.

Favorite Readings

  1. 15-second ads coming to Amazon’s Alexa
  2. 18 months after discovery, the “Nintendo PlayStation” is finally working
  3. Apple buys Beddit, a sleep-tracking company with existing Apple Watch app
  4. Engineering and yellow lights
  5. Hundreds of apps can listen for marketing 'beacons' you can't hear
  6. ‘I don’t know who I am without it’: the truth about long-term antidepressant use
  7. Introducing Stack Overflow Trends
  8. LSD microdoses make people feel smarter, and scientists want to know why
  9. Making a game in Rust
  10. Measles outbreak rages after anti-vaccine groups target vulnerable community
  11. Meet the tech-savvy activists trying to take over the Democratic Party
  12. My two-month ride with Peloton, the cultish, internet-connected fitness bike
  13. New Windows look and feel, Neon, is officially the “Microsoft Fluent Design System”
  14. Notes on 'The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World'
  15. Sleep it off: What you can and can’t learn from sleep tracking wearables
  16. The amazing dinosaur found (accidentally) by miners in Canada
  17. The creepy, insane, and undeniably romantic world of cryonics
  18. The diseases you only get if you believe in them
  19. The grass is always greener - my struggles with Rust
  20. Ubuntu 17.04 review: Don’t call it abandonware, per se
  21. U.K. hospitals hit in widespread ransomware attack
  22. Vive experiments
  23. What is digital humanism?
  24. You're not going to believe what I'm about to tell you

Books Read

Games Played

2017.04.25

Vitamin B12

In continuing my goal of understanding the ways I can become more healthy, I spent this past month researching Vitamin B12. This vitamin is important for vegetarians like myself to stay on top of, as it is easy to become deficient in it.

Favorite Readings

  1. A plan to preserve the internet
  2. Awesome by proxy: addicted to fake achievements
  3. God in the machine: my strange journey into transhumanism
  4. Growing Ubuntu for cloud and IoT, rather than phone and convergence
  5. Hackers set off Dallas’ 156 emergency sirens over a dozen times
  6. Hottest editors
  7. Is the European Union worth it or should we end it?
  8. Mastodon.social is an open-source Twitter competitor that’s growing like crazy
  9. One-third of Americans are willing to eat lab-grown meat regularly
  10. Soylent recalls powder after dairy accidentally slips into 1.8 powder
  11. The deep space of digital reading
  12. The Lilly Suicides
  13. The Mac Pro Lives
  14. The uncertain future of democracy
  15. Tomorrow's Cities: Singapore's plans for a smart nation
  16. Who will remember you in 100 years?

Updates

I added a few more problems to Project Euler In Swift. Since completing these, I have experimented briefly with Python and Rust, and have started to plan out doing a comparison of all these languages using Project Euler. But getting a more in-depth grasp of Swift is important before doing so.

AutoSleep 4.0 brought about a slight update to Tracking Sleep. Functionality remains the same, but the graphics of the app have been refreshed to provide for a nicer experience.

2017.04.06

Project Euler In Swift

Since I am not a full-time professional programmer, a lot of the code work that I do is just for fun. A lot of this consists of small projects and solving challenges and puzzles that other people release.

Project Euler is my main source of these types of puzzles. All of them are math problems of varying difficulty. As of right now, there are currently 585 problems to solve on there.

My language of choice when it comes to non-web programming is constantly changing. I enjoy seeing what is available and playing around with the different paradigms. Since it's release, Swift is a language I keep coming back to. It hits all of the right marks for me, ones that a lot of other popular languages like Python do not. For that reason, I have decided to work through all of the problems in Project Euler In Swift. One new problem a week is my current goal, which given that there are 585 problems, with more periodically being added, it will take me over 11 years to complete this exercise.

Updates

About The Author was updated to include detailed information about all of my current computer systems. During this process, I did a basic benchmark of all of the systems using GeekBench 4. Seeing how all of my computing devices stack up on performance was interesting, particularly the part where my phone is now faster than my laptop.

Software Tools now displays the first selection of applications that I regularly use. Every application on there follows the principles I listed, when it is relevant.

This month, my game of choice was the original System Shock. I missed out on this game when it first came out in 1994, and unfortunately, it is a hard game to go back and play. It is an old school game, particularly with regards to complexity. The interface is cluttered and controls are obtuse, even by the standards of the time. Still, it was an enlightening experience, particularly to see an earlier work of Warren Spector.

Tools Used To Make This has been updated with more information about how this site functions automatically, as well as information about how I test the performance of the site.

2017.03.18

Exercise

In recent years, the amount of time I spend exercising has lessened. I would occasionally exercise, but it kept becoming more sporadic. Weight gain has been steady since I left college, and especially since we moved up here to Oregon.

In an attempt to help alleviate these problems, I looked back at how I exercised in college and recreated a similar routine. I have been following this exercise routine for a few months now, and while I am still perfectin certain aspects of it, I have found it easy to keep up with and it is helping my weight and overall health.

Updates

AutoSleep is now the app I use for tracking my sleep. There are a number of improvements that it has over Sleep++, with the main one being that I no longer have to manually enable it every night and disable it every morning. It just works™.

6 months ago, I wrote my first steps to completely logging off Facebook. Since then, I have missed Facebook not in the slightest. The other night, I reopened my account just so I can go in and initiate the full deletion of the account. Before doing that, I looked around at the news feed and the walls of a few of my friends. My decision to cut back on social media has been solidified. Facebook has not changed in the 6 months since I stopped using it, and it probably never will. My life is better without it.

I am at the end of building the list of Games I Have Played. All major systems have their games entered and linked up to further information about the game. I know there are going to be random games here and there that I have not entered due to not remembering them. But as now, this is the most complete list of every game I have played. And it is much bigger than I anticipated.

And finally, this month's new game was Grim Fandango Remastered. Overall, it was an enjoyable game, and a fun revisit to one of my favorite adventure games of all time. But as much as I enjoyed playing through it, adventure games of this style do not hold me the way that they used to. I love everything about this game, except for the gameplay. Too bad it's not a movie, or a TV miniseries, or something else along those lines.

2017.02.27

A New Format... Again

Before getting into other topics, I would be remiss to not talk about the slightly new format on here. When I created this site, I initially started it out as a standard blog, where I would post every few weeks. These were my "notes". After 10 months of doing this, I created the "book", which took the same content, but acted as my most up-to-date versions of those writings. I tried to make the two sit together, but this ended up being more work than I enjoyed.

The "book" portion of the site ended up being the more fun part for me. While I do not wish to put unfinished work up, the nature of some of what I enjoy writing about is that it will never be complete, or it would become outdated at some point.

The solution I have come up with is to combine the two into one. Now, The Krueger Report is just one piece that more closely resembles the "book" portion of the old version.

My writing will still be the same as it was before. The way I write is to focus on a single topic each month, and work on completing that. I will be maintaining that schedule, but instead of a separate "notes" section, I will post updates to both this page as well as a new Atom feed that can be subscribed to. This feed will show periodical updates, linking to the new pages I have written, along with quick summaries of what I have updated. Much like this very update.

Software Tools

Anyone who knows me knows that I am incredibly picky about what software I use. I will painstakingly research as many possibilities as I can for any application type that I use.

There has always been a set of criteria that I follow, but I wanted to write down exactly what they were, instead of just leaving it a bit nebulous in my head. The last few months, I made notes about my thinking as I evaluated new applications. When reviewing these notes, I found that they were all related to five specific criteria.

In Software Tools, I wrote up what these five criteria are. In the future, this will also be where I delve into specific examples of applications that I currently use, and how they make use of all of the rules set forth.

Updates

Games I Have Played saw the biggest change this month. I began to add console systems and mobile games to the list, as well as breaking out the list into different sections based on the platform the game was played on. This page is time consuming, as I have played a lot of games in my life, but it is one of my favorite to go back and research, just to remember again the many games I have played but since forgotten. There is a lot of work to do yet on this list, but it is shaping up to being closer to where I want it to be.